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The Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program of BC

Legal Considerations
Representation Agreements
FAQs — Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who should I choose to represent me?
  2. Do I also need an enduring power of attorney?
  3. Do I have to go to a lawyer or notary public?
  4. What happens when I die?

Who should I choose to represent me?

There are many factors to consider when choosing the people you want to help you, for example knowledge, skills, health. Trust is an important factor as well as respect for your wishes.

It is a good idea to name more than one person in your Agreement so you will have a “back up” in case one of them becomes ill, dies or resigns. The people you choose can live in another city, province or country.

Do I also need an Enduring Power of Attorney?

You may be able to cover all areas with the Representation Agreement. However, if you own real estate property and you would like to include this in your legal plan, you should use Enduring Power of Attorney. You should consult your notary public or lawyer if you are not certain.

Do I have to go to a lawyer or notary public?

It is recommended that you see a notary public or a lawyer when making a Representation Agreement. They can help you understand the wide range of issues surrounding this legal document and to avoid mistakes.

What happens when I die?

A Representation Agreement ends when you die. Then your Will takes over.

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